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Emergency Planning

Council and emergency services work together to prevent and prepare for all types of emergencies.
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Not everyone thinks clearly in an emergency. Take steps now to prepare yourself, your home and your family by writing an emergency plan so that you’ll know what to do when an emergency occurs. A written plan will help you remember what needs to be done. A good plan will include:

  • Emergency contacts
  • Actions to complete before and during the fire/flood season
  • Actions to complete on high risk days
  • Actions to complete when fire/flood is in your area
  • Actions to complete after the fire/flood has passed
  • A back-up plan

Once you have a plan/s, make sure everyone in your home knows about the plan and where it is kept. If you live alone, tell a friend, neighbour or family member what your plan is. Keep it somewhere prominent, like on the fridge or by the front door.

Practice your emergency plan as this will reduce the amount of stress and panic you may experience in an emergency and you can make changes before the emergency.

It is also important to ensure your home, business or property is adequately insured and the cover is up to date. Make sure you understand what is covered under certain circumstances.

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Airly-Clydebank Hall
556 Clydebank Road, Airly
Binginwarri Hall and Recreation Reserve
675 Albert River-Welshpool Road, Binginwarri
Boisdale Public Hall
42-44 Main Street, Boisdale
Briagolong Mechanics Institute Hall
2 Avon Street, Briagolong
Bundalaguah/Myrtlebank Hall
794 Maffra-Sale Road, Bundalaguah
Carrajung South Hall
89 Old Carrajung Road, Carrajung Lower
Coongulla Community Centre
Gillum Road, Coongulla
Cowwarr Public Hall
31-33 Main Street, Cowwarr
Dargo Public Hall and Recreation Reserve
177 Lind Avenue, Dargo
Denison Public Hall
1293 Denison Road, Denison
Devon North Public Hall
599 Tarra Valley Road, Devon North
Giffard West Public Hall
3877 South Gippsland Highway, Giffard West
Glenmaggie Mechanics Institute (Public Hall)
21 Glenfalloch Road, Glenmaggie
Golden Paradise Beach Community Centre
Surf Edge Drive, Golden Beach
Gormandale Mechanics Institute
Main Road, Gormandale
Heyfield Community Resource Centre
3-5 George Street, Heyfield
Heyfield Memorial Hall
38-40 MacFarlane Street, Heyfield
Kilmany Public Hall and Recreation Reserve
21 Freshwaters Road, Kilmany
Licola Public Hall
8 Jamieson-Licola Road, Licola
Loch Sport Public Hall
222-236 National Park Road, Loch Sport
Longford Hall and Recreation Reserve
Corner South Gippsland and Longford-Loch Sport Road, Longford
Macks Creek Public Hall
Bulga Park Road, Macks Creek
Maffra Memorial Hall
11-15 Foster Street, Maffra
Manns Beach Hall
David Street, Manns Beach
Meerlieu Public Hall and Recreation Reserve
1455 Lindenow-Meerlieu Road, Meerlieu
Munro Public Hall
191 Munro-Stockdale Road, Munro
Nambrok Public Hall and Recreation Reserve
173 Nambrok Hall Road, Nambrok
Newry Hall
139-141 Main Road, Newry
Port Albert Mechanics Institute
20 Victoria Street, Port Albert
Rosedale Public Hall
37-39 Prince Street, Rosedale
Sale Memorial Hall
Macalister Street, Sale
Seaton Hall and Recreation Reserve
1043 Main Street, Seaton
St Johns Ambulance Hall
Stead Street Reserve, Sale
Staceys Bridge Hall
248 Albert River Road, Staceys Bridge
Stradbroke Recreation Reserve and Hall
4971 South Gippsland Highway, Stradbroke
Stratford Mechanics Hall
17 Hobson Street, Stratford
Tinamba Public Hall
Rosedale-Maffra Road, Tinamba
Valencia Soldiers Memorial Hall
84-86 Briagolong Road, Valencia Creek
Willung Public Hall
195 Willung Hall Road, Willung
Won Wron Hall
4737 Hyland Highway, Won Wron
Wonyip Public Hall
Old Wonyip Road, Wonyip
Woodside Public Hall
Corner Prince Street and Austins Road, Woodside
Yarram Mechanics Hall
2-4 Church Street, Yarram
Alberton West Recreation Reserve
331 - 333 Lanes Road, Alberton West
Bellbird Corner Riverside Reserve
Sandy Creek Road, Maffra
Binginwarri Hall and Recreation Reserve
675 Albert River-Welshpool Road, Binginwarri
Boisdale Recreation Reserve
Main Street, Boisdale
Briagolong Quarry Reserve
Freestone Creek Road, Briagolong
Briagolong Recreation Reserve
Briagolong Road, Briagolong
Cameron Sporting Complex
Morison Street, Maffra
Carrajung Memorial Park
McDermott Street, Carrajung
Charles Street Recreation Reserve
Charlies Street, Loch Sport
Cowwarr Recreation Reserve
2-24 Pine Grove Avenue, Cowwarr
Dargo Public Hall and Recreation Reserve
177 Lind Avenue, Dargo
Denison Recreation Reserve
1422 Sale-Heyfield Road, Denison
Devon North Recreation Reserve
683 Tarra Valley Road, Devon North
Golden Beach (Veronica Maybury) Recreation Reserve
Surf Edge Drive, Golden Beach
Gordon Street Recreation Reserve
Gordon Street, Heyfield
Gormandale Recreation Reserve
14-16 Main Road, Gormandale
Kilmany Public Hall and Recreation Reserve
21 Freshwaters Road, Kilmany
Loch Sport Foreshore Reserve
Lake Street, Loch Sport
Longford Hall and Recreation Reserve
Corner South Gippsland and Longford-Loch Sport Road, Longford
Maffra Recreation Reserve
Corner Edward Street and McLean Street, Maffra
Meerlieu Public Hall and Recreation Reserve
1455 Lindenow-Meerlieu Road, Meerlieu
Nambrok Public Hall and Recreation Reserve
173 Nambrok Hall Road, Nambrok
Newry Community Tennis Courts and Parklands
30 McGole Street, Newry
Newry Recreation Reserve
838 Three Chain Road, Newry
Pine Lodge Reserve
Llowalong Road, Stratford
Port Albert Racecourse and Recreation Reserve
Port Albert - Tarraville Road, Port Albert
Rosedale Racecourse Reserve
10 Evergreen Road, Rosedale
Rosedale Recreation Reserve
Moore Street, Rosedale
Seaspray Foreshore Reserve
Corner Futcher Street and Shoreline Drive, Seaspray
Seaton Hall and Recreation Reserve
1043 Main Street, Seaton
Stradbroke Recreation Reserve and Hall
4971 South Gippsland Highway, Stradbroke
Stratford Recreation Reserve
Wellsford Street, Stratford
Tarraville Recreation Reserve
9 Bridge Street, Tarraville
Won Wron Recreation Reserve
4706 Hyland Hwy, Won Wron
Woodside Recreation Reserve
4-18 High Street, Woodside
Yarram Recreation Reserve
50 Railway Avenue, Yarram
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Home Emergency Kit

Your household should have an emergency kit prepared to help yourself and your family in an emergency.

Basic Emergency Kit

A basic emergency kit may include:

  • Battery operated radio and torch (with spare batteries), candles and matches
  • First aid kit
  • Protective clothing such as sturdy gloves, face and dust masks
  • Copy of home emergency plan
  • Copies of important documents, or ensure copies are on a portable hard drive or web-based cloud drive
  • Non-perishable food, eating utensils and drinking water for up to three days
  • Camping stove or gas burner
  • Whistle to signal for help
  • Utility knife, duct tape, scissors, plastic sheeting
  • Toilet paper, moist towelettes and rubbish bags
  • List of contact numbers for your doctor, dentist, local hospital, chemist, insurance company, vet, Council and utility providers

Additional Items to Add

If you are leaving early, evacuate or if a warning is issued, you may want to place the following additional items in your kit and have it ready to take with you:

  • Mobile phone, power bank and charger
  • Prescriptions, medications, sunscreen and toiletries
  • Important documents such as passports, birth certificates and insurance papers
  • Photographs, heirlooms and other irreplaceable items
  • Pet supplies – food, water, bowls, leash etc.
  • Protective clothing and strong shoes for each family member
  • Pillows, blankets and sleeping bags
  • Books and games for children
  • Credit cards and cash
  • Special items for babies the disabled or elderly in your family

It is recommended that you check the items in your emergency kit every year, and replace expired items with fresh items. Keep your emergency kit somewhere easy to locate. Make sure that other members of your household know where the emergency kit is stored.

Emergency Planning Checklist

Personal Emergency Planning - Bushfires

Risk is most extreme if you live surrounded by or near forest or woodland. By recognising and understanding your risk this will also help you to start preparing your property for fire and know what to do.

One of the best ways to start planning is to look at where you live. Visit the CFA's 'Am I at Risk' page for further information.

The CFA Before and During a Bushfire page will help you understand your fire risk and know what to do before and during a fire. The CFA advocate that staying to defend your property is risky and that leaving early is the safest option to protect yourself and your family. Either way, you should have:

  • A plan for Leaving Early
  • A plan for Staying to Defend your Property
  • A plan for People Who Need Extra Support

What if you are Travelling?

If you are travelling or holidaying anywhere around the state this summer, make sure you're FireReady. Stay informed, be prepared and pack some essential items so you're ready to leave when you need to - Safe Travellers Checklist.

Back Up Plans

Fires are unpredictable and plans can fail. Having a Back-up Plan that identifies your shelter or last resort options may save your life if you are caught in a fire.

If leaving a high-risk area is no longer an option, your planned options are not possible or you have no plan and there is threat of bushfire you should be aware of what alternative shelter options are close by. Shelter options may include:

It is important to understand that traveling to or sheltering in some of these locations does not guarantee your safety.

Personal Emergency Planning - Floods & Storms

Floods can affect you if you live, work or visit areas close to creeks, rivers, drains or low-lying land. Every flood is different, but being prepared can help you to stay safe, reduce damage and save money.

Every home and business should have a home emergency plan, up to date insurance, an emergency contact list and an emergency kit.

Personal Emergency Planning - Heatwaves & Extreme Heat

A heatwave is a period of unusual and uncomfortable hot weather that could impact on human health, community infrastructure (such as the power supply and public transport), and services.

The best way to survive the heat is to plan ahead for hot days and know what to do when the heat hits. Hot weather can affect anyone, including the young and healthy. However, some people are more at risk than others.

People most vulnerable to heatwaves and extreme heat:

  • Aged over 65 years, especially those living alone
  • Those with medical conditions such as diabetes, kidney disease or mental illness
  • Have a disability or mobility issues
  • Babies and young children
  • Pregnant or nursing mothers
  • Are overweight or obese
  • Work or exercise outdoors

Coping with the heat:

  • Drink plenty of water, even if you don’t feel thirsty
  • Keep yourself cool by using wet towels, taking cool (not cold) showers and wearing light natural fibre clothing
  • Naturally cool your home - close windows and blinds in the day
  • Spend as much time as possible in cool or air-conditioned buildings (library, shopping centre, cinema)
  • Keep in touch with sick or frail friends and family
  • Talk to your health service if you have health issues

More information:

House Numbers

In the event of an emergency, emergency service vehicles need to be able to locate your property easily and quickly and your house number needs to be clearly visible from the road.

Guidelines for displaying house numbers include:

  • Minimum height for house numbers is 75mm
  • Use plain, legible numbers from white or yellow reflective material
  • Display the numbers on the front of your letterbox
  • Keep bushes and shrubs trimmed around your letterbox
  • If you live in a unit or flat make sure your house number is located on the wall next to your front door.

Pets in Emergencies

Your pets, horses and livestock are your responsibility. Failing to plan ahead for your pets' safety during an emergency puts everyone's lives at risk. The following information will help you prepare to ensure the welfare of your pets during emergency events, such as bushfires or floods:

  • Include arrangements for your pets in your personal emergency plans.
  • Include pet food, water and spill-proof containers and any medicines are in your emergency kit.
  • Have secure carry cages, trailers and leads available.
  • Prepare a list of preferred kennels, catteries, animal shelters, farms or friends that would be prepared to temporarily house your pets in an emergency.
  • Keep vaccinations up to date in case they need to be admitted to a boarding facility or shelter.

You may become separated from your pets in an emergency:

  • Ensure a trusted neighbour, family member or friend has a key to your house/yard/farm in case they need to access your pets.
  • Ensure your pets are identifiable with a collar, name tag, council registration tag, and a microchip – and your contact details on the pet are current.

More information on preparing a pet emergency kit, evacuating with your pet and how to prepare for pets that need to remain at the property can be found on the Agriculture Victoria website.

Community Led Emergency Planning

Communities, when supported with the right tools, are in the best position to lead activities that result in stronger, more connected and prepared communities. Evidence from previous emergencies has shown that connected communities are resilient communities. They recover more quickly following an emergency and suffer fewer long term effects.

We have developed the Community Emergency Planning Guide to support local communities who want to take an active role in planning for emergencies within their local community.

The CFA also have some resources and contacts for community-led and community-based planning.

Community Emergency Planning Guide

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2020 Minutes and Agendas

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Your household should have an emergency kit prepared to help yourself and your family in an emergency.

Basic Emergency Kit

A basic emergency kit may include:

  • Battery operated radio and torch (with spare batteries), candles and matches
  • First aid kit
  • Protective clothing such as sturdy gloves, face and dust masks
  • Copy of home emergency plan
  • Copies of important documents, or ensure copies are on a portable hard drive or web-based cloud drive
  • Non-perishable food, eating utensils and drinking water for up to three days
  • Camping stove or gas burner
  • Whistle to signal for help
  • Utility knife, duct tape, scissors, plastic sheeting
  • Toilet paper, moist towelettes and rubbish bags
  • List of contact numbers for your doctor, dentist, local hospital, chemist, insurance company, vet, Council and utility providers

Additional Items to Add

If you are leaving early, evacuate or if a warning is issued, you may want to place the following additional items in your kit and have it ready to take with you:

  • Mobile phone, power bank and charger
  • Prescriptions, medications, sunscreen and toiletries
  • Important documents such as passports, birth certificates and insurance papers
  • Photographs, heirlooms and other irreplaceable items
  • Pet supplies – food, water, bowls, leash etc.
  • Protective clothing and strong shoes for each family member
  • Pillows, blankets and sleeping bags
  • Books and games for children
  • Credit cards and cash
  • Special items for babies the disabled or elderly in your family

It is recommended that you check the items in your emergency kit every year, and replace expired items with fresh items. Keep your emergency kit somewhere easy to locate. Make sure that other members of your household know where the emergency kit is stored.

2019 Minutes and Agendas

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Your household should have an emergency kit prepared to help yourself and your family in an emergency.

Basic Emergency Kit

A basic emergency kit may include:

  • Battery operated radio and torch (with spare batteries), candles and matches
  • First aid kit
  • Protective clothing such as sturdy gloves, face and dust masks
  • Copy of home emergency plan
  • Copies of important documents, or ensure copies are on a portable hard drive or web-based cloud drive
  • Non-perishable food, eating utensils and drinking water for up to three days
  • Camping stove or gas burner
  • Whistle to signal for help
  • Utility knife, duct tape, scissors, plastic sheeting
  • Toilet paper, moist towelettes and rubbish bags
  • List of contact numbers for your doctor, dentist, local hospital, chemist, insurance company, vet, Council and utility providers

Additional Items to Add

If you are leaving early, evacuate or if a warning is issued, you may want to place the following additional items in your kit and have it ready to take with you:

  • Mobile phone, power bank and charger
  • Prescriptions, medications, sunscreen and toiletries
  • Important documents such as passports, birth certificates and insurance papers
  • Photographs, heirlooms and other irreplaceable items
  • Pet supplies – food, water, bowls, leash etc.
  • Protective clothing and strong shoes for each family member
  • Pillows, blankets and sleeping bags
  • Books and games for children
  • Credit cards and cash
  • Special items for babies the disabled or elderly in your family

It is recommended that you check the items in your emergency kit every year, and replace expired items with fresh items. Keep your emergency kit somewhere easy to locate. Make sure that other members of your household know where the emergency kit is stored.

2018 Minutes and Agendas

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Your household should have an emergency kit prepared to help yourself and your family in an emergency.

Basic Emergency Kit

A basic emergency kit may include:

  • Battery operated radio and torch (with spare batteries), candles and matches
  • First aid kit
  • Protective clothing such as sturdy gloves, face and dust masks
  • Copy of home emergency plan
  • Copies of important documents, or ensure copies are on a portable hard drive or web-based cloud drive
  • Non-perishable food, eating utensils and drinking water for up to three days
  • Camping stove or gas burner
  • Whistle to signal for help
  • Utility knife, duct tape, scissors, plastic sheeting
  • Toilet paper, moist towelettes and rubbish bags
  • List of contact numbers for your doctor, dentist, local hospital, chemist, insurance company, vet, Council and utility providers

Additional Items to Add

If you are leaving early, evacuate or if a warning is issued, you may want to place the following additional items in your kit and have it ready to take with you:

  • Mobile phone, power bank and charger
  • Prescriptions, medications, sunscreen and toiletries
  • Important documents such as passports, birth certificates and insurance papers
  • Photographs, heirlooms and other irreplaceable items
  • Pet supplies – food, water, bowls, leash etc.
  • Protective clothing and strong shoes for each family member
  • Pillows, blankets and sleeping bags
  • Books and games for children
  • Credit cards and cash
  • Special items for babies the disabled or elderly in your family

It is recommended that you check the items in your emergency kit every year, and replace expired items with fresh items. Keep your emergency kit somewhere easy to locate. Make sure that other members of your household know where the emergency kit is stored.

2017 Minutes and Agendas

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Your household should have an emergency kit prepared to help yourself and your family in an emergency.

Basic Emergency Kit

A basic emergency kit may include:

  • Battery operated radio and torch (with spare batteries), candles and matches
  • First aid kit
  • Protective clothing such as sturdy gloves, face and dust masks
  • Copy of home emergency plan
  • Copies of important documents, or ensure copies are on a portable hard drive or web-based cloud drive
  • Non-perishable food, eating utensils and drinking water for up to three days
  • Camping stove or gas burner
  • Whistle to signal for help
  • Utility knife, duct tape, scissors, plastic sheeting
  • Toilet paper, moist towelettes and rubbish bags
  • List of contact numbers for your doctor, dentist, local hospital, chemist, insurance company, vet, Council and utility providers

Additional Items to Add

If you are leaving early, evacuate or if a warning is issued, you may want to place the following additional items in your kit and have it ready to take with you:

  • Mobile phone, power bank and charger
  • Prescriptions, medications, sunscreen and toiletries
  • Important documents such as passports, birth certificates and insurance papers
  • Photographs, heirlooms and other irreplaceable items
  • Pet supplies – food, water, bowls, leash etc.
  • Protective clothing and strong shoes for each family member
  • Pillows, blankets and sleeping bags
  • Books and games for children
  • Credit cards and cash
  • Special items for babies the disabled or elderly in your family

It is recommended that you check the items in your emergency kit every year, and replace expired items with fresh items. Keep your emergency kit somewhere easy to locate. Make sure that other members of your household know where the emergency kit is stored.

2016 Minutes and Agendas

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Your household should have an emergency kit prepared to help yourself and your family in an emergency.

Basic Emergency Kit

A basic emergency kit may include:

  • Battery operated radio and torch (with spare batteries), candles and matches
  • First aid kit
  • Protective clothing such as sturdy gloves, face and dust masks
  • Copy of home emergency plan
  • Copies of important documents, or ensure copies are on a portable hard drive or web-based cloud drive
  • Non-perishable food, eating utensils and drinking water for up to three days
  • Camping stove or gas burner
  • Whistle to signal for help
  • Utility knife, duct tape, scissors, plastic sheeting
  • Toilet paper, moist towelettes and rubbish bags
  • List of contact numbers for your doctor, dentist, local hospital, chemist, insurance company, vet, Council and utility providers

Additional Items to Add

If you are leaving early, evacuate or if a warning is issued, you may want to place the following additional items in your kit and have it ready to take with you:

  • Mobile phone, power bank and charger
  • Prescriptions, medications, sunscreen and toiletries
  • Important documents such as passports, birth certificates and insurance papers
  • Photographs, heirlooms and other irreplaceable items
  • Pet supplies – food, water, bowls, leash etc.
  • Protective clothing and strong shoes for each family member
  • Pillows, blankets and sleeping bags
  • Books and games for children
  • Credit cards and cash
  • Special items for babies the disabled or elderly in your family

It is recommended that you check the items in your emergency kit every year, and replace expired items with fresh items. Keep your emergency kit somewhere easy to locate. Make sure that other members of your household know where the emergency kit is stored.

2015 Minutes and Agendas

No items found.

Your household should have an emergency kit prepared to help yourself and your family in an emergency.

Basic Emergency Kit

A basic emergency kit may include:

  • Battery operated radio and torch (with spare batteries), candles and matches
  • First aid kit
  • Protective clothing such as sturdy gloves, face and dust masks
  • Copy of home emergency plan
  • Copies of important documents, or ensure copies are on a portable hard drive or web-based cloud drive
  • Non-perishable food, eating utensils and drinking water for up to three days
  • Camping stove or gas burner
  • Whistle to signal for help
  • Utility knife, duct tape, scissors, plastic sheeting
  • Toilet paper, moist towelettes and rubbish bags
  • List of contact numbers for your doctor, dentist, local hospital, chemist, insurance company, vet, Council and utility providers

Additional Items to Add

If you are leaving early, evacuate or if a warning is issued, you may want to place the following additional items in your kit and have it ready to take with you:

  • Mobile phone, power bank and charger
  • Prescriptions, medications, sunscreen and toiletries
  • Important documents such as passports, birth certificates and insurance papers
  • Photographs, heirlooms and other irreplaceable items
  • Pet supplies – food, water, bowls, leash etc.
  • Protective clothing and strong shoes for each family member
  • Pillows, blankets and sleeping bags
  • Books and games for children
  • Credit cards and cash
  • Special items for babies the disabled or elderly in your family

It is recommended that you check the items in your emergency kit every year, and replace expired items with fresh items. Keep your emergency kit somewhere easy to locate. Make sure that other members of your household know where the emergency kit is stored.

2014 Minutes and Agendas

No items found.

Your household should have an emergency kit prepared to help yourself and your family in an emergency.

Basic Emergency Kit

A basic emergency kit may include:

  • Battery operated radio and torch (with spare batteries), candles and matches
  • First aid kit
  • Protective clothing such as sturdy gloves, face and dust masks
  • Copy of home emergency plan
  • Copies of important documents, or ensure copies are on a portable hard drive or web-based cloud drive
  • Non-perishable food, eating utensils and drinking water for up to three days
  • Camping stove or gas burner
  • Whistle to signal for help
  • Utility knife, duct tape, scissors, plastic sheeting
  • Toilet paper, moist towelettes and rubbish bags
  • List of contact numbers for your doctor, dentist, local hospital, chemist, insurance company, vet, Council and utility providers

Additional Items to Add

If you are leaving early, evacuate or if a warning is issued, you may want to place the following additional items in your kit and have it ready to take with you:

  • Mobile phone, power bank and charger
  • Prescriptions, medications, sunscreen and toiletries
  • Important documents such as passports, birth certificates and insurance papers
  • Photographs, heirlooms and other irreplaceable items
  • Pet supplies – food, water, bowls, leash etc.
  • Protective clothing and strong shoes for each family member
  • Pillows, blankets and sleeping bags
  • Books and games for children
  • Credit cards and cash
  • Special items for babies the disabled or elderly in your family

It is recommended that you check the items in your emergency kit every year, and replace expired items with fresh items. Keep your emergency kit somewhere easy to locate. Make sure that other members of your household know where the emergency kit is stored.

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Page last updated:
Thursday, November 14, 2019
Contact Us
Wellington Shire Council
After Hours Emergency
Service Centres
Sale Service Centre
18 Desailly Street (PO Box 506)
Sale VIC 3850
Operating Hours
Monday to Friday 8.30am - 5.00pm
Yarram Service Centre
156 Grant Street
Yarram VIC 3971
Operating Hours
Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday 10.00am - 2.00pm (Closed Wednesday)
Official website of Wellington Shire Council © 2020.
Wellington Shire Council acknowledges the Gunaikurnai People as the traditional owners of the land that is now Wellington Shire.