environment
New black-bodied bins

NOTICE

Important information regarding your Council Kerbside bin collection service

We are planning for significant changes to the waste collection service in Wellington Shire. In January and February 2024, new black-bodied bins will replace current green-bodied bins, aligning with Victoria’s recycling policy. Your green-bodied bins will be collected and removed during this process. These changes also include standardising bin lid colour across all households with kerbside collection.

Black-bodied kerbside bin mailout

The below mailout was distributed to property owners November 29 2023.

FAQ – your new black-bodied kerbside bins

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Am I getting new bins?

Yes! In January and February 2024, every household’s current landfill and recycling kerbside bins will be replaced with new black-bodied bins.

  • Yellow lid bin is for recycling.  
  • Red lid bin is for general waste.

What do I need to do?

  • New black-bodied bins will be delivered between January and February 2024 (even if you’re not home).
  • Once delivered, put your green-bodied bins out for one last kerbside bin collection on your normal bin day.
  • Once emptied, leave your green-bodied bins on your kerbside to be removed.
  • You can now start using your new black-bodied bins.

I don’t receive a kerbside collection; will I get new bins?

The new bin rollout only applies to residential properties that already receive a kerbside collection.

If you live in an area that doesn’t receive a kerbside bin collection, you don’t pay for it through your rates. The Waste Infrastructure Charge is a separate charge and pays for the management and operation of landfills across the municipality. For example, if you live near Dargo, this charge supports ongoing operations of the Dargo Transfer Station.

Why am I getting new bins?

More than 50% of current kerbside bins are over 10 years old and at the end of their lifecycle, there are many residents with old, broken and brittle bins. Replacing bins all at once allows us to be more efficient, rather than travelling large distances to each property as requests are made.

The swap over will also bring all bins under standardised lid colours, as required by Victorian law. By ensuring consistent colour-coding across all household bins in Victoria, confusion will be reduced when it comes to separation of household waste and recycling across the state.

Is this the most efficient way?

Yes, our sustainability and waste team has researched all options extensively.

The kerbside bins in Wellington Shire are all different sizes and shapes so we can't replace lids easily.

More than 50% of bins are over 10 years old and need to be replaced anyway. Replacing bins all at once allows us to be more efficient, rather than travelling large distances to each property as requests are made.

What happens to my old bins?

After your old, green-bodied bins are collected, they will be transported to a plastics recycling facility where they will be shredded and made into new bins for other councils.

Our new black bins are made of up to 80% recycled materials from bins from other councils, supporting our commitment to the circular economy.

My bins haven’t been dropped off/collected. What do I do?

Your old, green-bodied bins may take up to around three business days to be removed. Please leave them out until they have been removed and allow extra time for unexpected delays.

If your old bins have not been collected or you have not received your new bins by 29 February 2024, phone Cleanaway on (03) 5133 6872.

Do I have to surrender my existing bins?

Yes. All Wellington Shire branded bins are the property of Wellington Shire Council and do need to be surrendered. If you keep your old bins and put them out for a service collection, they will not be serviced and will be removed.

The Garbage charge and landfill levy on your rates notice pays for the waste collection service not the physical bin. You will not be charged for the new bins.

Why black-bodied bins?

Black-bodied bins contain up to 80% recycled content, compared with green-bodied bins which only contain up to 30%.

By choosing black-bodied bins, Council is increasing its uptake of recycled materials in its operations and supporting Victoria’s circular economy.

The new bins are rebranded and barcoded to each individual property, which will help identify stolen bins and with contamination monitoring.

How big are the new bins?

The only difference to your new bins is the colour. There will be no change to sizes.

The yellow lid recycling bin is 240 litres.

The red lid general waste bin is 120 litres.

Is there a cost for the new bins?

The cost of the entire bin rollout is commercial in confidence and part of a contract. The cost of each new bin is $50. Payment will be built into the garbage charge found on rates notices over the next decade, and works out to be $5 per year. Only properties with a kerbside bin collection pay this charge.

The garbage charge and landfill levy on your rates will remain the same for the 2023-2024 rates period. This charge pays for the waste collection service not the physical bin.

If you live in an area that doesn’t receive a kerbside bin collection, you don’t pay for it through your rates. The Waste Infrastructure Charge is a separate charge that pays for the management and operation of landfills across the municipality. For example, if you live near Dargo, this charge supports ongoing operations of the Dargo Transfer Station.

You can recycle for free at any of the eight waste facilities in Wellington and reduce the amount of waste you’re sending to landfill. For recycling tips check out our waste and recycling guide Waste and Recycling Guide: https://www.wellington.vic.gov.au/environment/waste-and-recycling-guide

As a community, if we consume less, recycle more, and send less waste to landfill, costs associated with waste will reduce.

What is a RFID tag and why is it on my bin?

While some are confusing RFID tags with some sort of spying device, the truth is a lot less controversial.

Radio Frequency Identification tags are used across many Councils to keep track of waste management data. Wellington has invested in RFID tags during this new bin rollout so Council is ready for future advances in waste management processes.

RFID tags need to be near a specialised reader for any data to be collected. This means most of the time they will do nothing because they don’t have a battery.

Currently, the tags only contain the serial number of the bin, to help identify which property the bin belongs to. Only Council and its waste contractor have access to this information. Both parties adhere to strict privacy policies and information is only used for waste management.

In years to come, Wellington's garbage trucks may include readers to collect waste data to improve the efficiency of our waste management services. Council is charged per tonne of waste and recycling, so the RFID tags can collect data on how many bins have been emptied, whether bins are presented for collection multiple times a day, whether a bin has been missed etc.

Currently, Council's collection trucks do not carry readers, however when this does occur, Council will consult with the community. The tags have been fitted to bins now because it’s more cost effective when bins are being manufactured in bulk rather than driving to individual properties across the Shire and retrofitting bins.

Our contractor’s trucks are equipped with software that manages waste and recycling collection, which includes cameras to identify contamination. Council's waste team has access to the footage, regardless of whether bins have RFID or not. This way, Council’s waste team can track the rate of contaminants, like batteries and soft plastics in recycling, and whether education materials need to be issued to individual residents or the broader community. As a waste service provider, Council has a duty to dispose of the Shire’s waste responsibly and keep staff safe. This means meeting contamination targets to avoid contaminated recyclable material ending up in landfill and ensuring hazardous materials stay out of Council’s landfills and Transfer Stations.

What about FOGO/ 'green waste' and glass bins?

FOGO Bins

Food Organics and Garden Organics (FOGO) or ‘green waste’ bins are coming, but due to processing constraints in Gippsland this is taking some time. FOGO is expected by mid-2025 to 2026, aligning with Victorian Government targets for organics and glass recycling.

More info about FOGO here: Food Organics and Garden Organics (FOGO)

If you purchased your own ‘green waste’ bin collection service, this isn’t part of our kerbside bin collection it’s a private service.

Green waste (garden waste) is different to a green-bodied bin. If you’re not sure, contact us on 1300 366 244.

Glass Bins

Council is currently investigating the feasibility of introducing a monthly kerbside glass collection, with each household receiving a 120 litre purple-lid bin. Council is waiting to assess the impact of the State Government’s Container Deposit Scheme (which began on 1 November 2023) on the local glass stream, as a reduction is expected.

The Victorian Government’s Circular Economy policy requires each household to be provided with a glass collection, separate to other recycling items, by 2027. The separation of glass from the current commingled recycling bin is being introduced in response to the recycling industry’s concerns about glass contamination in other recyclables, particularly paper and cardboard.

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